France vs Quebec: How Do Accessible Pedestrian Signals Work Across the Atlantic?

France vs Quebec: How Do Accessible Pedestrian Signals Work Across the Atlantic?

France vs Quebec: How Do Accessible Pedestrian Signals Work Across the Atlantic?

 

On both sides of the Atlantic, accessible pedestrian signals allow blind or visually impaired people to know when is the right time to cross the street. But the regulations and technical features of these devices vary from country to country. 

Let’s take stock of the differences, advantages and disadvantages of each system in France and Quebec.

 

Common feature: Accessible Pedestrian Signals are the responsibility of cities

 

Whether in France or in Canada, it is the local administration that is in charge of the equipment of Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS). The government is only setting the obligations, standards and guidelines to follow.

In France, the equipment obligations stem from the Disability Act of 11 February 2005, which states:

“The transport chain, which includes the built environment, roads, public spaces, transport systems and their intermodality, is organized to be accessible to people with disabilities or reduced mobility.”

Disability Act of February 11, 2005

In Quebec, since 21 June 2019, the reference text is the Accessible Canada Act – An Act to ensure a barrier-free Canada. One of its founding principles is that: “all persons must have barrier-free access to full and equal participation in society, regardless of their disabilities”.

Mandatory norm vs guidelines

Paris has 1,770 signalised intersections, of which over 11,000 traffic lights have already been equipped with Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS). On the other side of the Atlantic in Montreal, there are 2,300 signalised intersections, and only 200 are equipped to help blind pedestrians cross the road. The city intends to improve this situation in the coming years, but these figures show that the incentive does not have as much impact as the legal obligation.

The technical characteristics of French APS are described in the NF S32-002 standard intended for the use of the blind or visually impaired persons published in 2004. A decree of 2006 makes it compulsory to bring up to this standard all new installations and whenever road work is carried out on a crossroad.

In Canada, there is no standard per se, but “Guidelines for Understanding, Use and Implementation of Accessible Pedestrian Signals” published in 2008. The installation of new APS is subject of a prioritization according to well-defined criteria:

⊗ User requests,

⊗ Configuration of the crossroad and complexity of pedestrian crossings: width of streets, speed of vehicles…

⊗ Number of pedestrians, especially visually impaired pedestrians, potential users: proximity to poles generating travel, public transport…

⊗ Difficulty of crossing the street without the help of APS: complexity of traffic flows or lack of sound cues…

These prioritization criteria are intended to sort out user requests, which can not all be met due to limited budgets.

On demand activation

 

Most APS installed in Quebec operate permanently. On the walk phase, a melody is emitted throughout the entire phase. However, this system tends to disappear in favor of on demand activation, in order to limit noise pollution. 

On demand activation APS emit a short, regular and permanent location beep. This beep allows visually impaired people to locate the push button used to activate the audio message on the walk phase. Simply press this button briefly or keep it pressed until a confirmation beep is emitted.

In France, all APS operate by activation. And almost always, they are only activated using a standard remote control that blind or visually impaired people can get from their town hall or associations specializing in visual impairment. Only the city of Paris, because of its very strong tourist traffic, keeps the possibility of activating the APS by a push button fixed on the mast of the traffic light.

The push button allows anyone to activate the APS without the need for specific equipment. However, it represents a difficulty for blind people. They must first locate the pedestrian crossing, then look for the mast, which is sometimes several meters away from the crossing, and finally find the button. The activation by a remote control makes it possible to dispense with all these stages. Good practices exist to organize the distribution system of this essential tool. In addition, it is possible to transfer the functionality of the remote control to a smartphone.

Audio indications

 

According to Canadian guidelines, APS must play a melody when pedestrians are invited to cross the road. During the wait phase and the release phase, most signals are silent. The fixed white silhouette indicating it is safe to cross is indicated by a carillon on the East-West axes, and by the sound of the cuckoo on the North-South axes.

For long crossings, the sound is emitted alternately on both sides of the road, so that visually impaired pedestrians can keep their direction while crossing.

An audio message may be broadcast at the push button location during the wait phase indicating the name of the street and information on the geometry of the crossroads to facilitate the crossing. This measure is however optional.

The French standard, on the other hand, provides for 3 types of audio indications: the audio message “Don’t walk”, the walk start tone and the normal walk tone.

The “Don’t walk” message must always be completed with the name of the street. This allows a visually impaired person to confirm his position. This message is easily customizable thanks to the parameterization tools provided by the manufacturers.

The start of the walk tone consists of a series of characteristic notes easily audible in the ambient noise of the circulation. The normal walk tone is a unique melody described in the APS standards.

 

Additional information on the Canadian side

 

According to the Canadian guidelines, other indications can be added to improve the information and facilitate the orientation of the blind or visually impaired:

⊗ A sign indicating the instructions for use of the APS,

⊗ A tactile arrow indicating the direction of the crossing,

⊗ The name of the street in Braille and in relief,

⊗ A relief plan showing the number of lanes, the traffic directions, the orientation of curbs and the presence of refuge islands.

Despite their usefulness, these elements are rarely all present because of the work of personalization and the important cost they generate. Also remember that only 10 to 15% of blind people read braille and are able to decipher a map in relief. The tactile elements also cause hygiene problems.

However, there is a security measure in Canada that France should learn from. In case of activation of an APS, all vehicle have to come to a complete stop, including turning vehicles. People who are blind or visually impaired are therefore no longer at risk of having their path blocked by a vehicle.

In conclusion…

 

Both French and Canadian Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) have advantages in terms of safety and use. However, for lack of regulatory constraints, APS are not widely used in Quebec, much less in their full version, which best satisfies the use of blind and partially sighted people. 

It must be recognized that French standardization and equipment requirements have considerably boosted the industrialization of new generation of APS. These use advanced technologies in terms of activation, parameterization and maintenance for a very reasonable cost.

 

media

Paris has 1,770 signalised intersections, of which over 11,000 traffic lights have already been equipped with Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS). In Montreal, there are 2,300 signalised intersections, and only 200 are equipped to help blind pedestrians cross the road.

writer

Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

stay updated

Get the latest news about accessibility and the Smart City.

other articles for you

follow us!

more articles

NEVER miss the latest news about the Smart City.

Sign up now for our newsletter.

Unsubscribe in one click. The information collected is confidential and kept safe.

powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

Mobility Apps for Blind People or how Technology Can Replace Special Assistance at the Airport

Mobility Apps for Blind People or how Technology Can Replace Special Assistance at the Airport

Mobility Apps for Blind People or How Technology Can Replace Special Assistance at the Airport?

 

Summer is here and holidays are coming up. Millions of us crowd to airports to fly to more or less distant destinations. And among us, people who are blind or visually impaired too! How do they get to their departure terminal, find their way in these disproportionate spaces, reach their check-in counter and then the boarding gate? In addition to passenger assistance services, technologies offer more and more possibilities to move independently and to enjoy the services of an airport in the same way as any other air passenger. Provided we take into account the specific needs of each and this is what we will discuss in more detail in this article.

Airport Assistance for Travelers with Disabilities or Reduced Mobility

When blind or visually impaired people make the decision to travel alone by plane, they may use airport assistance. They simply indicate their need of guided assistance during their flight reservation or by contacting the service directly at least 48 hours in advance.

With the regulation (EC) No 1107/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 July 2006 concerning the rights of disabled persons and persons with reduced mobility when travelling by air, the European Union transferred responsibility for passenger assistance to airports. In some countries such as the United States, however, it remains the responsibility of the airlines, which results in very disparate service levels.

Special assistance staff can help people with disabilities from the check-in counter on to the aircraft, as well as on arrival. Travelers who are blind or visually impaired are then accompanied to go through security and to the departure gate.

Reaching the Airport Assistance Point: A Major Difficulty for a Blind Person

Although special assistance starts at the check-in desk, how do you get there if you have low or no vision? Traveling to and from the transit point or the drop-off can be long and fraught.

One solution is to install call stations near these stopping points so that travelers with disabilities or reduced mobility can report their presence to the special assistance staff. This is what the European regulation advocates. But again, how do you find these call points when you cannot see? To be easily localizable, the call stations must:

⊗ Be visually contrasted with their environment

⊗ Be identifiable by an remote activated audio beacon

⊗ Be marked with a tactile path.

It will also be necessary to ensure the simplicity and usability: call button clearly visible and handy, sound return to confirm the consideration of the call, audio quality for communication.

Indoor Navigation Apps for Blind and Visually Impaired People

Checking in your luggage, passing through the security check, going to the departure gate and then on to the aircraft, the human assistance makes it possible to accomplish all this route easily and without stress. But blind and visually impaired people aspire to enjoy the same services as other travelers: going to restrooms, eating, shopping … This is even more important when the succession of flights requires them a long wait. In addition, the use of airport assistance requires anticipation that is not always possible (last-minute travel offers, unplanned business trips, family emergencies, etc.). That’s why being able to navigate independently in an airport with a visual impairment is a key issue.

Many international airports, such as Paris, Copenhagen or Houston, offer smartphone-based indoor navigation applications to guide travelers through their premises. These applications are generally based on Bluetooth low-energy beacons spread around the building, these same beacons that can transmit contextualized information.

But unlike what exists today, to guide the visually impaired, these applications must take into account their specific needs.

The user interface:

The application must be fully compatible with screen readers (VoiceOver for iOS and TalkBack for Android) and the zoom and comfort options on smartphones. All buttons, lists and other navigation items must be carefully labeled with explicit text.

Different input methods must be available: classic input, voice dictation or braille input on the screen.

Directions:

Visually impaired people generally do not have the ability to refer to a map or visual signage. The directions must therefore be indicated according to the position of the user, using either the clock face or provided in degrees.

Specific landmarks:

People who are blind or visually impaired rely on different landmarks from other travelers. These are essentially tactile or sound cues. Thus, the descriptions of routes provided by the application must mention these elements in a precise manner: tactile guide paths, warning indicators, audio beacons… These physical elements also make it possible to confirm one’s position and be reassured about the good course of the itinerary.

Wayfinding accuracy:

Although it is possible for sighted people to rectify the inaccuracy of navigation by glancing at the signage and their environment, this is much more complicated for people with low or no vision. Location accuracy is therefore an important factor in guiding a route and reaching the desired destination. But it is not the only one! Current technologies are not accurate within one meter. In order to fulfill the mobility objectives of end users, to ensure precise guidance and to lead them to their destination, other criteria intervene, in particular the accuracy of the instructions issued. Is the staircase ascending or descending? How many steps? Right or turning? Is there a door? A manual or automatic opening?

The involvement of end users in the project

Finally, the application must be customizable because the needs and user preferences vary from one person to another depending on their remaining visual abilities, their experience and their abilities. Any wayfinding application project should be the subject of a consultation of end users to identify their needs, but also of in situ experiments during development to validate the proper functioning of the system.

Today, the expertise acquired by professionals specialized in mobility of people with disabilities and the maturity of technologies make it possible to consider effective solutions for guiding people with visual impairments. This is the opportunity to offer them equal access to all services and freedom of choice in their daily lives, to allow them full participation in economic and social life.

media

Special assistance starts at the check-in desk. How do you get there if you have low or no vision? Traveling to and from the transit point or the drop-off can be long and fraught.

writer

Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

stay updated

Get the latest news about accessibility and the Smart City.

other articles for you

follow us!

more articles

NEVER miss the latest news about the Smart City.

Sign up now for our newsletter.

Unsubscribe in one click. The information collected is confidential and kept safe.

powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

Vision Zero: A Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

Vision Zero: A Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

Vision Zero: a Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

 

Looking for inspiration to improve road safety in your city? The Vision Zero movement continues to grow in the world. A few years for an ambitious but achievable goal: 0 traffic death on the roads!

“Because human life is priceless!” This could be the slogan of the international Vision Zero approach. Born in Sweden in 1997, this revolutionary approach to road safety aims to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads. How? By placing the responsibility for the risks of accidents on the designers of the road and not only on its users. From Stockholm to Toronto, through the largest cities in the United States, dozens of cities have joined the Vision Zero movement around the world. We invite you to discover this concept of a city primarily centered on respect for human life!

 

Different Strategies for Road Safety

 

The Vision Zero approach is based on a simple principle: fatalities are preventable, so they are unacceptable. This is to eliminate all causes of foreseeable accidents during the design or rehabilitation of the road network. The protection of life and human health is non-negotiable and is at the forefront of any other benefit (traffic flow, travel speed, etc.). The designers of the road networks must then make every effort to secure the travel of all, without forgetting the most vulnerable users: children, the elderly, people with disabilities or reduced mobility. While it is unrealistic to want to remove all accidents, it is almost always possible to limit their impact on the physical integrity and health of the victims.

 

3 Flagship Measures: Reducing Speed, Securing Roads and Raising Awareness Among Stakeholders

 

To succeed in your Vision Zero project, you should better proceed in stages. Before establishing an action plan, it is necessary to involve all stakeholders under strong and determined leadership. This is the approach adopted by the city of Montreal by forming a dedicated team, with 7 additional hires, and by forming a steering committee bringing together the most influential players in road safety. The next step is to analyze accident data in order to identify the risks and hazards present on the road network. The analysis of these data serves as the basis for the action plan.

 

Travel Speeds Adapted To The Infrastructure

The higher the speed, the greater the risk of mortality. The maximum speed in a given area is therefore calculated according to the characteristics of this area and adapted to the type of users:

⊗ In areas with motorized vehicles alongside pedestrians, the speed must not exceed 30 km/h (19 mph). This is the limit not to be exceeded for a pedestrian to have a chance of survival in a collision. It is even recommended to lower it to 20 km/h (12 mph). If the maximum permitted speed is greater, the pedestrian routes must be physically separated from the traffic lanes.

⊗ In areas with many intersections where vehicle crossings are possible, the speed must be less than 50 km/h (31 mph). Beyond that, a side impact can be fatal. At 50 km/h (31 mph), pedestrian flows must be protected.

⊗ In less dense traffic areas, with rare intersections, the recommended speed limit is 70 km/h (43 mph).

⊗ Finally, a speed greater than 100 km/h (62 mph) can only be justified when traffic lanes in opposite directions are clearly separated, eliminating any risk of frontal impact.

Measures To Eliminate Road Hazards

Street users should never be at risk of accidents as long as they follow the rules. This is the foundation of Vision Zero philosophy. It is the responsibility of the designers of the road to prevent as much as possible all the dangers. Some examples of measures to put in place:

⊗ Reduce the presence of motorized vehicles in the city;

⊗ Secure pedestrian crossings;

⊗ Upgrade the traffic lights using the most advanced technologies: digital countdown, activation of Accessible Pedestrian Signals for the blind and visually impaired, possibility of increasing the duration of the crossing for people with reduced mobility, etc. ;

⊗ Improve lighting;

⊗ Regulate the traffic of alternative modes and Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs), such as electric scooters, hoverboards, Segways, skateboards, etc. ;

⊗ Secure school surroundings;

⊗ Improve cycling conditions.

Awareness Actions

By reversing the traditional vision of road safety, the Vision Zero approach implies a change in mindsets among the decision makers and designers of the road and its users.

Thus, the training of road actors fits into most Vision Zero action plans, as in London, New York City, San Antonio or Chicago.

For the benefit of users, the city of Montreal has issued a charter of good conduct on which everyone can commit to road safety.

San Francisco’s LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired has launched its own awareness campaign to remind drivers of the right of way for pedestrians with a white cane or guide dog when crossing the street.

 

In short

250 stakeholders have already joined the global Vision Zero movement.

Speed ​​reduction, securing roads and educating stakeholders, there are countless measures to make the city safer for all its users.

The success of a Vision Zero project comes first and foremost through political commitment, the coordination of stakeholders and the scrupulous monitoring of actions.

 

media

Street users should never be at risk of accidents as long as they follow the rules. This is the foundation of Vision Zero philosophy. It is the responsibility of the designers of the road to prevent as much as possible all the dangers.

writer

Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

stay updated

Get the latest news about accessibility and the Smart City.

other articles for you

follow us!

more articles

NEVER miss the latest news about the Smart City.

Sign up now for our newsletter.

Unsubscribe in one click. The information collected is confidential and kept safe.

powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

1868-2019: A Brief History of Traffic Lights

1868-2019: A Brief History of Traffic Lights

1868-2019: a Brief History of Traffic Lights

 

Red, green, yellow… three-color traffic lights are now a daily part of every person’s life. But it wasn’t always like that. While their presence in city centers is now being questioned, they still fulfil an essential function by regulating the competing flows of traffic at an intersection. Let’s take a look at a hundred and fifty years of history.

 

The First (Disastrous) Trial in England

 

December 10, 1868: the official birth date of the world’s first traffic light. It was installed at Parliament Square in London. The system was composed of two mobile signs attached to pivoting arms that were manipulated by a lever. The post was topped with a gas-lit semaphore to ensure visibility. But it was short-lived. Less than two months later, the traffic light exploded, killing the police officer who worked the signs.

The world had to wait 46 years until electricity use became widespread before the first dual-colored traffic light, using this new energy, was installed in Cleveland in the United States. Detroit and New York added yellow between red and green in 1920. The traffic lights that we now know were born and became the norm throughout the world.

 

1920-1930: Traffic Lights Up Europe

 

In 1923, the first mechanical traffic light using electricity was installed in Paris at the intersection of Boulevard de Strasbourg and Grands Boulevards. Most of Europe’s largest cities soon followed suit: Berlin in 1924, Milan in 1925, Rome in 1926, London in 1927, Prague in 1928, Barcelona in 1930… And the system was exported to Tokyo in 1931.

 Accessible Pedestrian Signals: A Century of Change: read our last article!

Standardization and Regulation in the 1930s

 

The first Convention on the Unification of Road Signals was signed in Geneva on March 30, 1931. Its goal was to increase road traffic safety and facilitate international movement by road through a uniform system of road signals. The majority of signs that we recognize today were defined through this treaty. Traffic lights with three colors (red, yellow, green) became the standard.

 

Specific Lights for Pedestrians

 

Pedestrian signals quickly appeared after the tri-colored traffic lights. At the start, they took various forms but matched the colors used by vehicles: red and green. Round, square or rectangular, they often gave the instruction “Wait” in red and “Walk” in green. In 1974, regulations introduced the figures that we know today, brought in because of a concern for foreign speakers and international standardization. However, the installation of pedestrian signals was initially overlooked due to their cost and their disputed usefulness. In Paris at least, since 1955, they have been systematically installed at the city’s intersections.

 

Systematic Use of Traffic Lights Since 1950

 

Road traffic rose dramatically between 1950 and 1980, creating a need for an increasingly stricter regulation of traffic and the near ubiquitous use of traffic lights. In 2011, the largest French cities had an average of one traffic light-controlled intersection for every 1,000 inhabitants.

 

While they have long been considered the best solution for managing competing traffic flows, traffic lights are today suspected of fostering accident-prone behavior. This is the reason why many cities are reconsidering the systematic use of traffic lights and are preferring other methods for reducing the speed of vehicles. At the same time, they want to offer better circulation conditions for non-motorised mobility and public transportation. Out of this desire have emerged new light signals for giving these methods right of way. The issue today is to ensure that the most vulnerable road users remain safe and maintain their independence to travel in an environment whose points of reference are in flux.

media

The world’s first traffic light (…) was short-lived. Less than two months later, the traffic light exploded, killing the police officer who worked the signs.

writer

Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

stay updated

Get the latest news about accessibility and the Smart City.

other articles for you

follow us!

more articles

NEVER miss the latest news about the Smart City.

Sign up now for our newsletter.

Unsubscribe in one click. The information collected is confidential and kept safe.

powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

 

Eighty million Europeans living with a disability will benefit from more accessible goods and services at competitive prices! The European Accessibility Act was adopted by the European Parliament and Council. Member States have a six-year transition period before having to fully enforce it. Among the areas it covers are information for travelers, vending machines, banking services, e-commerce, e-books and emergency numbers. It is a small revolution for those with a disability and a huge challenge for businesses.

Towards Free Movement of Accessible Goods and Services

The European Accessibility Act has been on the agenda since July 2017 and has two principal goals:

⊗ Improve the daily life of the elderly, disabled people and people with reduced mobility throughout the entire European Union (80 million people at a conservative estimate); and

⊗ Facilitate the circulation of accessible goods and services by removing barriers created by divergent laws among the various Member States.

Businesses should see a reduction in costs from the standardization of accessibility laws throughout Europe. Furthermore, they will gain access to a large market for their products and services.


As for those living with a disability, they will benefit from a wider range of accessible goods and services at more competitive prices. Benefits are also expected for them in the areas of education and job access. Their expertise in accessibility should see a rise in demand and their professional integration will be eased by software accessibility.

Principles of Universal Design

Under this new European directive, goods and services should be designed in a way that allows them to be used by everyone, regardless of their particular difficulty:

⊗ color-blindness, poor vision or complete blindness;

⊗ poor hearing or profound deafness;

⊗ speech problems or total mutism;

⊗ problems in gripping or absence of physical strength;

⊗ reduced mobility;

⊗ cognitive difficulties (reading, gesturing, memory, etc.).

Essentially, every good or service must be “perceptible, usable, understandable and sturdy.” This means:

⊗ An action should be possible by using different sensory methods (voice message, speech recognition, visual display, touch);

⊗The transfer of information should also be possible via various sensory methods;

⊗ Visual contrasts ought to be considered;

⊗ The font can be increased;

⊗ It should be possible to change the volume and speed of audio messages;

⊗ Actions requiring strength or precision should be limited;

⊗ Latency time between two actions ought to be open to configuration;

⊗ There should be information on accessibility functions;

⊗ And, of course, assistance technologies should be compatible (screen readers, audio support, voice command, etc.).

Interested to know if Accessible Pedestrian Signals are required in your country? Check this article!

From Ticketing Machines to E-commerce Platforms, Many Areas Are Covered!

The directive mainly applies to digital services and related equipment:

⊗ Computers and operating systems;

⊗ Ticketing machines, check-in machines;

⊗ Smartphones;

⊗ Audiovisual services, digital television and related equipment;

⊗ Telephony services;

⊗ Public transportation ticketing and related information (road, rail, air, sea or river);

⊗ Bank services;

⊗ E-books; and

⊗ E-commerce.

Now that the European Accessibility Act has been adopted by the European Parliament and the European Council, only its publication in the Official Journal remains. After that formality, Member States will have three years to transpose the directive into national law and another three to apply it. Some associations representing disabled people have criticized the text’s lack of ambition, lamenting how it does not apply to transportation infrastructure, streets and buildings. It also includes many restrictions for small businesses. Let’s hope however that the new European Accessibility Act will be a positive impetus for the extension of universal design to all areas of everyday life!

media

For those living with a disability, they will benefit from a wider range of accessible goods and services at more competitive prices.

writer

Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

stay updated

Get the latest news about accessibility and the Smart City.

other articles for you

follow us!

more articles

NEVER miss the latest news about the Smart City.

Sign up now for our newsletter.

Unsubscribe in one click. The information collected is confidential and kept safe.

powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.