Vision Zero: A Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

Vision Zero: A Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

Vision Zero: a Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

 

Looking for inspiration to improve road safety in your city? The Vision Zero movement continues to grow in the world. A few years for an ambitious but achievable goal: 0 traffic death on the roads!

“Because human life is priceless!” This could be the slogan of the international Vision Zero approach. Born in Sweden in 1997, this revolutionary approach to road safety aims to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads. How? By placing the responsibility for the risks of accidents on the designers of the road and not only on its users. From Stockholm to Toronto, through the largest cities in the United States, dozens of cities have joined the Vision Zero movement around the world. We invite you to discover this concept of a city primarily centered on respect for human life!

 

Different Strategies for Road Safety

 

The Vision Zero approach is based on a simple principle: fatalities are preventable, so they are unacceptable. This is to eliminate all causes of foreseeable accidents during the design or rehabilitation of the road network. The protection of life and human health is non-negotiable and is at the forefront of any other benefit (traffic flow, travel speed, etc.). The designers of the road networks must then make every effort to secure the travel of all, without forgetting the most vulnerable users: children, the elderly, people with disabilities or reduced mobility. While it is unrealistic to want to remove all accidents, it is almost always possible to limit their impact on the physical integrity and health of the victims.

 

3 Flagship Measures: Reducing Speed, Securing Roads and Raising Awareness Among Stakeholders

 

To succeed in your Vision Zero project, you should better proceed in stages. Before establishing an action plan, it is necessary to involve all stakeholders under strong and determined leadership. This is the approach adopted by the city of Montreal by forming a dedicated team, with 7 additional hires, and by forming a steering committee bringing together the most influential players in road safety. The next step is to analyze accident data in order to identify the risks and hazards present on the road network. The analysis of these data serves as the basis for the action plan.

 

Travel Speeds Adapted To The Infrastructure

The higher the speed, the greater the risk of mortality. The maximum speed in a given area is therefore calculated according to the characteristics of this area and adapted to the type of users:

⊗ In areas with motorized vehicles alongside pedestrians, the speed must not exceed 30 km/h (19 mph). This is the limit not to be exceeded for a pedestrian to have a chance of survival in a collision. It is even recommended to lower it to 20 km/h (12 mph). If the maximum permitted speed is greater, the pedestrian routes must be physically separated from the traffic lanes.

⊗ In areas with many intersections where vehicle crossings are possible, the speed must be less than 50 km/h (31 mph). Beyond that, a side impact can be fatal. At 50 km/h (31 mph), pedestrian flows must be protected.

⊗ In less dense traffic areas, with rare intersections, the recommended speed limit is 70 km/h (43 mph).

⊗ Finally, a speed greater than 100 km/h (62 mph) can only be justified when traffic lanes in opposite directions are clearly separated, eliminating any risk of frontal impact.

Measures To Eliminate Road Hazards

Street users should never be at risk of accidents as long as they follow the rules. This is the foundation of Vision Zero philosophy. It is the responsibility of the designers of the road to prevent as much as possible all the dangers. Some examples of measures to put in place:

⊗ Reduce the presence of motorized vehicles in the city;

⊗ Secure pedestrian crossings;

⊗ Upgrade the traffic lights using the most advanced technologies: digital countdown, activation of Accessible Pedestrian Signals for the blind and visually impaired, possibility of increasing the duration of the crossing for people with reduced mobility, etc. ;

⊗ Improve lighting;

⊗ Regulate the traffic of alternative modes and Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs), such as electric scooters, hoverboards, Segways, skateboards, etc. ;

⊗ Secure school surroundings;

⊗ Improve cycling conditions.

Awareness Actions

By reversing the traditional vision of road safety, the Vision Zero approach implies a change in mindsets among the decision makers and designers of the road and its users.

Thus, the training of road actors fits into most Vision Zero action plans, as in London, New York City, San Antonio or Chicago.

For the benefit of users, the city of Montreal has issued a charter of good conduct on which everyone can commit to road safety.

San Francisco’s LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired has launched its own awareness campaign to remind drivers of the right of way for pedestrians with a white cane or guide dog when crossing the street.

 

In short

250 stakeholders have already joined the global Vision Zero movement.

Speed ​​reduction, securing roads and educating stakeholders, there are countless measures to make the city safer for all its users.

The success of a Vision Zero project comes first and foremost through political commitment, the coordination of stakeholders and the scrupulous monitoring of actions.

 

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Street users should never be at risk of accidents as long as they follow the rules. This is the foundation of Vision Zero philosophy. It is the responsibility of the designers of the road to prevent as much as possible all the dangers.

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Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

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Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

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Pedestrian Safety: Are your Pedestrian Crossings Safe for Visually-Impaired and Blind People?

Pedestrian Safety: Are your Pedestrian Crossings Safe for Visually-Impaired and Blind People?

Pedestrian Safety: Are your Pedestrian Crossings Safe for Visually-Impaired and Blind People?

 

Have you ever paid attention to pedestrian crossings in your city? If some of you walk across them safely every day, for other people their life is at stake on each crossing. This article will help you better understand the issue that pedestrian crossings represent in terms of pedestrian safety especially for visually-impaired and blind people. You will never see your crosswalks in the same way again!

Why pedestrian safety is important?

We are all pedestrians. Virtually every trip begins and ends with walking even if you use public transport or your personal vehicle. According to the World Health Organizationmore than 270,000 pedestrians are killed on roads each year. Pedestrians constitute 22% of all road deaths. Moreover, millions of people become permanently disabled due to severe injuries caused by traffic-related crashes while they were walking. Road accidents, however, should not be considered inevitable as they are both predictable and preventable.

Moving safely ought to be a fundamental and inalienable right. It is an essential condition for the social participation of all. The feeling of insecurity causes the most vulnerable people to stay at home. This concerns children, the elderly and more generally all people with disabilities or reduced mobility. Moreover, walking should be promoted as an important mode of transport given its potential to improve health and preserve the environment.

Because they have social, psychological and physical consequences, pedestrian fatalities and injuries generate costs for society. It is difficult to estimate the economic impact of pedestrian road traffic crashes precisely, but road traffic crashes in general are evaluated between 1 and 2% of gross national product.

All around the World, dozens of leading cities have committed to Vision Zero with one strong objective: eliminating all traffic fatalities and severe injuries on roads. They have developed Vision Zero action plans which consist in identifying the most hazardous traffic areas, implementing new regulations, and redesigning safer streets.

Key risks to pedestrians are both related to driver behavior (speed, mobile phone use during driving, alcohol, drugs…) and infrastructure (lack of pedestrian facilities in roadway design, lack of visibility…).

Pedestrian crossing points are particularly dangerous because they include a large number of conflicts between pedestrians and other modes of transport: cars, busses, bikes, but also Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs), such as electric scooters, hoverboards, Segways, etc. Crossing streets safely is even more challenging for visually-Impaired and blind people.

How to improve pedestrian safety?

Pedestrian safety measures for visually-impaired and blind people

To travel independently, people with visual impairment mainly use auditory and tactual information. Some of them can use their remaining sight and are very sensitive to brightness contrast. Roadway design must take their needs into account to enable them to identify safe pedestrian paths, detect streets and know the proper time to cross. For further information about techniques visually-impaired and blind people use to travel safely, read our article: How Do the Blind Safely Cross the Road?

Here are some tools that really improve the orientation and safety of people with visual disability:

⊗ Detectable warning surfaces or truncated domes are textured ground surface indicators which alert people when they reach the edges of pavements or steps. Detectable warning surfaces are particularly useful at lowered curbs when the sidewalk grade is equal to the grade of the street.

⊗ Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) help visually-impaired and blind people to identify the WALK interval at intersections. When well set up and positioned, accessible pedestrian signals are also helpful to locate crosswalks and maintain alignment while crossing.

⊗ Tactile paving can also be used to lead pedestrians with low vision towards safe crossing places. Guidance path surfaces are generally made of raised flat-topped bars that can be followed by walking on the surface or maintaining contact with a white cane. They indicate the right direction to cross the road.

⊗ Pedestrian crossings must contrast with the surrounding surface so that visually impaired people with remaining sight can see them. Zebra crossings with white stripes on a dark surrounding surface are mostly well recognized and recommended for their high visibility.

Other safety measures for all pedestrians

Visually-impaired and blind pedestrians also benefit from measures that are taken to improve the safety of all walkers. Pedestrian crossings are a major issue because there are pedestrian and vehicle conflict points. Road safety good practice can really improve the situation.

⊗ Motor vehicle speed is a major risk factor for road safety. Speed reduction has been proven to lower the number of pedestrian fatalities and injuries. Raised platforms, pavement narrowings, optical treatments, roundabouts are effective measures to reduce speed at intersections. However, it is important to keep markings and auditory clues for pedestrians with a visual impairment.

⊗ Simple measures can be taken to simplify crossing location, increase visibility between pedestrians and motorists, and shorten crossing distances. Concrete curb extensions, clearer intersection geometry, markings improvements pedestrian fencing and upgrading pedestrian ramps are among them.

⊗ Raised medians and pedestrian refuge islands allow pedestrians to cross one direction of traffic at a time. These make the crossing task much easier. Moreover, medians and refuge islands provide a space to install improve lighting which reduces the nighttime pedestrian fatalities on crosswalks. It is also important to install pedestrian signals with auditory systems on these islands.

⊗ Bike lanes should be separated from sidewalks using raised elements so that pedestrians do not fear any collisions.

⊗ Right-Turn-on-Red (RTOR) allows motorists to turn right on a red signal after stopping and yielding. While this measure may improve the traffic flow, it has increased pedestrian and bicyclist accidents. RTOR should be avoided as far as possible.

⊗ Parking areas, trees and street furniture that impede visibility at pedestrian crossings should be removed.

Is Montreal a Fit City for Blind People to Live in? Read our last article!

 

Pedestrian Safety: Major features and benefits of Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS)

 

What is an Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS)?

Crossing the street when you are a blind person is a real challenge on a daily basis. Among the many existing solutions, Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) represent the best option to secure and facilitate the crossing for visually-impaired and blind people. An APS is an integrated device that sends an audio signal to indicate to pedestrians if they can cross the road safely. This device allows blind pedestrians to cross the road at the right time, more quickly and safely while maintaining their orientation throughout the crossing.

Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) began to emerge in the 1970s in the United States and have since largely evolved to adapt to their environment and their users. APS are known by different names around the world such as: acoustic signals, audio-tactile signals, audible pedestrian signals, audible traffic signals, audible pedestrian traffic signals or audible crossing indicators.

From a legal point of view, the APS must comply with local laws of each country. In America, for example The Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) states that pedestrian safety considerations should be included in new transportation plans and projects. The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) includes guidance for APS installation, location and standards.

 

How Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) features improve pedestrian safety?

APS greatly contribute to securing the road network. The audio signal indicates the right moment to engage on a pedestrian crossing. Although listening to traffic flow is essential to avoid the risk of an accident, the acoustic signal makes decision-making a lot easier. By installing APS in your city, join the Vision Zero movement that has already conquered 250 cities around the world.

In addition to pedestrian safety, there are many other features and advantages that make APS an attractive solution for for both local decision-makers, installers and end-users:

⊗ Easy to install: APS are easy solutions to implement compared to road works to comply with accessibility requirements. In addition, the electronic card can be easily inserted into the pedestrian signal already installed,

⊗ Inexpensive: the overall cost ratio (maintenance, installation, purchase) compared to the functionalities provided is attractive,

⊗ Useful: in addition to the WALK/WAIT signal essential for blind pedestrians to know when to cross, some APS also indicate the names of parallel and perpendicular streets to better get their bearings,

⊗ Reducing noise pollution: recent APS offer an alternative to continuous noise by allowing the pedestrian to trigger the audio signal with a remote control on demand,

⊗ Customizable: some APS have been designed to adapt to the city and to users by modulating the sound volume according to the ambient noise. Other parameters may also be added depending on models.

As we know hearing is the first sense used to compensate for the lack of vision and visual and tactile cues to locate a pedestrian crossing are not enough. Therefore the use of an audio signal is essential. APS is also the ideal solution to compensate for the road installation defects and the lack of local safety measures by creating safe road environment for pedestrians and drivers.

 New York City Accessibility: Are Pedestrian Crossings Safe for Blind People? Read our last article!

Join the movement for a safe pedestrian environment and save thousands of lives every year. Investing in city-wide security is about saving lives and building a society in which everyone can find their place regardless of their disability or age. Let’s build together the inclusive city of tomorrow!

 

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It is difficult to estimate the economic impact of pedestrian road traffic crashes precisely, but they are evaluated between 1 and 2% of gross national product.

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Zoe Gervais

Zoe Gervais

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Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

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By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

1868-2019: A Brief History of Traffic Lights

1868-2019: A Brief History of Traffic Lights

1868-2019: a Brief History of Traffic Lights

 

Red, green, yellow… three-color traffic lights are now a daily part of every person’s life. But it wasn’t always like that. While their presence in city centers is now being questioned, they still fulfil an essential function by regulating the competing flows of traffic at an intersection. Let’s take a look at a hundred and fifty years of history.

 

The First (Disastrous) Trial in England

 

December 10, 1868: the official birth date of the world’s first traffic light. It was installed at Parliament Square in London. The system was composed of two mobile signs attached to pivoting arms that were manipulated by a lever. The post was topped with a gas-lit semaphore to ensure visibility. But it was short-lived. Less than two months later, the traffic light exploded, killing the police officer who worked the signs.

The world had to wait 46 years until electricity use became widespread before the first dual-colored traffic light, using this new energy, was installed in Cleveland in the United States. Detroit and New York added yellow between red and green in 1920. The traffic lights that we now know were born and became the norm throughout the world.

 

1920-1930: Traffic Lights Up Europe

 

In 1923, the first mechanical traffic light using electricity was installed in Paris at the intersection of Boulevard de Strasbourg and Grands Boulevards. Most of Europe’s largest cities soon followed suit: Berlin in 1924, Milan in 1925, Rome in 1926, London in 1927, Prague in 1928, Barcelona in 1930… And the system was exported to Tokyo in 1931.

 Accessible Pedestrian Signals: A Century of Change: read our last article!

Standardization and Regulation in the 1930s

 

The first Convention on the Unification of Road Signals was signed in Geneva on March 30, 1931. Its goal was to increase road traffic safety and facilitate international movement by road through a uniform system of road signals. The majority of signs that we recognize today were defined through this treaty. Traffic lights with three colors (red, yellow, green) became the standard.

 

Specific Lights for Pedestrians

 

Pedestrian signals quickly appeared after the tri-colored traffic lights. At the start, they took various forms but matched the colors used by vehicles: red and green. Round, square or rectangular, they often gave the instruction “Wait” in red and “Walk” in green. In 1974, regulations introduced the figures that we know today, brought in because of a concern for foreign speakers and international standardization. However, the installation of pedestrian signals was initially overlooked due to their cost and their disputed usefulness. In Paris at least, since 1955, they have been systematically installed at the city’s intersections.

 

Systematic Use of Traffic Lights Since 1950

 

Road traffic rose dramatically between 1950 and 1980, creating a need for an increasingly stricter regulation of traffic and the near ubiquitous use of traffic lights. In 2011, the largest French cities had an average of one traffic light-controlled intersection for every 1,000 inhabitants.

 

While they have long been considered the best solution for managing competing traffic flows, traffic lights are today suspected of fostering accident-prone behavior. This is the reason why many cities are reconsidering the systematic use of traffic lights and are preferring other methods for reducing the speed of vehicles. At the same time, they want to offer better circulation conditions for non-motorised mobility and public transportation. Out of this desire have emerged new light signals for giving these methods right of way. The issue today is to ensure that the most vulnerable road users remain safe and maintain their independence to travel in an environment whose points of reference are in flux.

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The world’s first traffic light (…) was short-lived. Less than two months later, the traffic light exploded, killing the police officer who worked the signs.

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Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

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Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

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on the accessibility market.

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By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

 

Eighty million Europeans living with a disability will benefit from more accessible goods and services at competitive prices! The European Accessibility Act was adopted by the European Parliament and Council. Member States have a six-year transition period before having to fully enforce it. Among the areas it covers are information for travelers, vending machines, banking services, e-commerce, e-books and emergency numbers. It is a small revolution for those with a disability and a huge challenge for businesses.

Towards Free Movement of Accessible Goods and Services

The European Accessibility Act has been on the agenda since July 2017 and has two principal goals:

⊗ Improve the daily life of the elderly, disabled people and people with reduced mobility throughout the entire European Union (80 million people at a conservative estimate); and

⊗ Facilitate the circulation of accessible goods and services by removing barriers created by divergent laws among the various Member States.

Businesses should see a reduction in costs from the standardization of accessibility laws throughout Europe. Furthermore, they will gain access to a large market for their products and services.


As for those living with a disability, they will benefit from a wider range of accessible goods and services at more competitive prices. Benefits are also expected for them in the areas of education and job access. Their expertise in accessibility should see a rise in demand and their professional integration will be eased by software accessibility.

Principles of Universal Design

Under this new European directive, goods and services should be designed in a way that allows them to be used by everyone, regardless of their particular difficulty:

⊗ color-blindness, poor vision or complete blindness;

⊗ poor hearing or profound deafness;

⊗ speech problems or total mutism;

⊗ problems in gripping or absence of physical strength;

⊗ reduced mobility;

⊗ cognitive difficulties (reading, gesturing, memory, etc.).

Essentially, every good or service must be “perceptible, usable, understandable and sturdy.” This means:

⊗ An action should be possible by using different sensory methods (voice message, speech recognition, visual display, touch);

⊗The transfer of information should also be possible via various sensory methods;

⊗ Visual contrasts ought to be considered;

⊗ The font can be increased;

⊗ It should be possible to change the volume and speed of audio messages;

⊗ Actions requiring strength or precision should be limited;

⊗ Latency time between two actions ought to be open to configuration;

⊗ There should be information on accessibility functions;

⊗ And, of course, assistance technologies should be compatible (screen readers, audio support, voice command, etc.).

Interested to know if Accessible Pedestrian Signals are required in your country? Check this article!

From Ticketing Machines to E-commerce Platforms, Many Areas Are Covered!

The directive mainly applies to digital services and related equipment:

⊗ Computers and operating systems;

⊗ Ticketing machines, check-in machines;

⊗ Smartphones;

⊗ Audiovisual services, digital television and related equipment;

⊗ Telephony services;

⊗ Public transportation ticketing and related information (road, rail, air, sea or river);

⊗ Bank services;

⊗ E-books; and

⊗ E-commerce.

Now that the European Accessibility Act has been adopted by the European Parliament and the European Council, only its publication in the Official Journal remains. After that formality, Member States will have three years to transpose the directive into national law and another three to apply it. Some associations representing disabled people have criticized the text’s lack of ambition, lamenting how it does not apply to transportation infrastructure, streets and buildings. It also includes many restrictions for small businesses. Let’s hope however that the new European Accessibility Act will be a positive impetus for the extension of universal design to all areas of everyday life!

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For those living with a disability, they will benefit from a wider range of accessible goods and services at more competitive prices.

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Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

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Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

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By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

Digital Accessibility: Why? For Whom? How?

Digital Accessibility: Why? For Whom? How?

Digital Accessibility: Why? For Whom? How?

 

Even though the digital world has now become an intricate part of our lives, we still only have a fuzzy idea of what digital accessibility is. We often think it’s enough to provide blind people with an audio description of images on websites. This article takes a quick look at the situations and areas concerned along with the resources available to make digital tools accessible to everyone.

What Is Digital Accessibility?

Digital accessibility is the provision of access to information and, more importantly, to all functions of a digital tool to the entire population, irrespective of a person’s specific needs.


Whether temporarily or for life, every user can be affected by a visual, auditory, motor, psychiatric, intellectual or cognitive disability. Such disabilities have impacts on the ability to read, enter text, recognize images, make a precise gesture or even locate important information.

What Areas Does Digital Accessibility Encompass?

Digital accessibility applies to all tools based on digital technology. Of course, this includes the Internet but there are many other tools, all essential for our daily lives in the twenty-first century:

⊗ Software and software packages;

⊗ Mobile apps

⊗ Documents (PDFs and others);

⊗ Human-computer interaction (HCI), information terminals, ticketing machines, etc.;

⊗ Connected objects.

Likewise, the aspects of daily life affected by digital accessibility are continually expanding. We use digital tools for researching information and communicating through email or social media. We also use them to manage our time, go shopping, perform administrative tasks, learn, relax, monitor our exercise and health, manage our accounts and many other things. We should not forget all their uses in relation to travel: GPS, multi-modal trip planning, public transportation schedules, ordering a ride, searching for nearby restaurants, etc.


And people living with a disability do not want to be left behind. They want the same range of choices that is open to those without a disability.

Some Basic Advice for Successful Digital Accessibility

Without going into too many details, there are good practices that should be followed to ensure the digital service you offer can be used by everyone. Here are some of them:

⊗ Check compatibility with W3C standards;

⊗ Differentiate between types of content (e.g. by style sheets);

⊗ Pay attention to visual contrast;

⊗ Structure information (headings, areas, paragraphs, etc.);

⊗ Describe images through optional text;

⊗ Use keyboard shortcuts;

⊗ Subtitle videos;

⊗ Transcribe audio and video files;

⊗ Label the fields on forms;

⊗ Use alternatives to captchas.

Ever wondered how blind people use a smartphone? Read our article!

How to Improve Digital Accessibility?

We have selected some resources that you might find useful for the project that you are working on:

⊗ Color Contrast Analyzer;

⊗ The W3C Markup Validation Service;

⊗ Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG);

⊗ Microsoft Accessibility;

⊗ Accessibility overview for Android Developers;

⊗ Accessibility on iOS for Apple Developers.

How to Test it?

You can download NVDA’s open-source screen reader free of charge to test the accessibility of a website, application or Windows-based software. The screen reader is widely used by people with impaired vision. For Android or iOS apps, you can just activate the accessibility options on your tablet or smartphone, in particular their respective screen readers TalkBack and VoiceOver. Where possible, we recommend using a panel of testers who have disabilities because they would be the best experts on their condition.

Remember that just as in the case of a building’s physical accessibility, digital accessibility costs much less when it is incorporated into the initial design. You therefore should not forget this aspect in your design briefs and consider it especially when upgrading.

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People living with a disability do not want to be left behind. They want the same range of choices that is open to those without a disability.

writer

Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

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Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

Disability Pride Month: What Is It and Why Is It Important?July celebrates Disability Pride Month! A month to support and raise awareness on disability. It gives people with disabilities an opportunity to be seen and heard. Obviously, everybody has their own...

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powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.