Have You Ever Heard About Visible Light Positioning? Tomas Escuin’s from i2CAT Offers His Insights

Have You Ever Heard About Visible Light Positioning? Tomas Escuin’s from i2CAT Offers His Insights

Have You Ever Heard About Visible Light Positioning? Tomas Escuin’s from i2CAT Offers His Insights

 

During our visit at the 9th edition of Smart City Expo in Barcelona we had the chance to discover a wide range of innovations which include a heavy emphasis on inclusion and accessibility. Among them, an encounter with Tomas Escuin and the innovation carried by his research center based in Catalonia i2CAT: Visible Light Positioning.

What is Visible Light Positioning? And how can it benefit the lives of disabled people?

Inclusive City Maker gives voice to Tomas Escuin in charge of the project development at local and international level.

Can you please introduce yourself and i2CAT?

I am Tomas Escuin, an industrial engineer with financial education and experience in technology transfer. 

The i2CAT Foundation is a non-profit research and innovation center that promotes mission-driven R&D activities on advanced Internet architectures, applications and services. More than 15 years of international research define our expertise in the fields of 5G, IoT, VR and Immersive Technologies, Cybersecurity, Blockchain, Open Big Data and AI. The center partners with companies, public administration, universities and end-users to leverage this knowledge in order to meet real society and business challenges.

 

“Fostering collaboration for an Internet based on intelligent systems and smart technologies.”

 

i2CAT promotes the technology transfer of the innovations and intellectual property outcome of research projects through:

⊗ Fostering strategic alliances to create innovative market-oriented technologies and solutions addressed to the different verticals.

⊗ Coordinating the design and deployment of trials for technological and functional validation purposes with local partners, public administration and users.

⊗ Setting up IPR exploitation agreements, creating mixed R&D teams with companies and boosting and supporting the creation of start-ups.

 

More information about i2CAT, key figures and the Annual Report here.

 

How does Visible Light Positioning work?

Visible light positioning works as the image below shows:

 visible light positioning

 

Ceiling lights emit different codes (blinking patterns) that can be read by the camera of a conventional smartphone, which is, in effect, taking pictures constantly. Thanks to the camera configuration that our app provides, the smartphone “sees” the light fixtures as barcodes that are translated as positions. Knowing the position of the different lights detected, the phone can calculate a specific position.

To make the lights blink, we have created a modulator that can be configured to switch on and off the lights by following the loaded code.

 

How does Visible Light Positioning can benefit disabled people in their day-to-day lives?

Our technology allows a high-accuracy and low-cost positioning system for indoor environments, so it can be used in a very wide range of cases. 

For disabled people, our approach would be to use the position of the individual in order to offer the user information about his/her immediate environment.

One case was the supermarket that you experienced at SCEWC. What we did was recreate a supermarket setting with products on shelves and ceiling lights. When pointing at products with the smartphone camera facing upwards, an audible message could be heard stating the nature of the product. 

In this context, Visible Light Positioning allows blind people to know which products are in front of them, but also allows people with motor disabilities who can not reach the products to read their labels.

But, this technology can have many more uses. For instance, we could deploy our system in subway/train stations, airports, state buildings or public venues as a way to guide people with visual impairments or to facilitate other information when pointing their phones at something (doors, signs, etc.).

 

Do all smartphones have light-sensing capabilities?

 

Yes and no… The only thing we do is take pictures constantly, but our App needs to “talk” with the camera of the phone to explain how to take those pictures in terms of exposure, shutter speed, contrast, etc… The issue is that not all phones have the required level of possibilities to deploy this camera configuration, but most do. We haven’t developed the app for iOS yet.

 

Is i2CAT working on other projects that could directly influence the lives of disabled people in the future?

 

Although we are not specifically targeting disabled people, we do our best to apply our research to society in general so that technology can benefit every citizen.

Vincles BCN is an example. It’s not intended for disabled people but for elders. Vincles BCN is a social innovation project that aims to strengthen the social ties of older people living in Barcelona who feel alone and to improve their well-being through new technologies. Its main objective is to break with the social isolation of the elderly through the establishment of a network of public support and of its personal environment, which includes family, friends, social workers and volunteers through the use of a tablet.

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In this context, Visible Light Positioning allows blind people to know which products are in front of them, but also allows people with motor disabilities who can not reach the products to read their labels.

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Zoe Gervais

Zoe Gervais

Content Manager

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The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

Smart City Expo: A Flagship Event Moving ‘Towards Inclusivity’

Smart City Expo: A Flagship Event Moving ‘Towards Inclusivity’

Smart City Expo: A Flagship Event Moving ‘Towards Inclusivity’

 

The city of Barcelona is about to host the 9th edition of the Smart City’s flagship international event: the Smart City Expo World Congress. This international trade show is the #1 meeting point for Smart City players, which has gathered more than one million visitors from around the world since its creation in 2011.

It is an opportunity for experts, politicians, companies, research centers and global organizations to share their vision and lead together the urban transformation of tomorrow.

Facts and figures about Smart City Expo

Smart City Expo infographic

An inclusive edition: ‘Towards Inclusivity’

A smart city is not just a sustainable and innovative city. Inclusion, and particularly inclusion of people with disabilities, remains an important innovation driver for the Smart City.

This year, the Smart City Expo World Congress puts inclusion at the heart of its approach with an initiative called ‘Towards Inclusivity’, proposing measures to limit the divide related to disability, language, religion or gender.

Here are the initiatives dedicated to disabled people that you can find during the event this year:

⊗ electric scooters available for people with reduced mobility,

⊗ reserved spaces for wheelchairs and electric scooters,

⊗ guided tour available for visually impaired people,

⊗ full accessibility of the venue.

Many debates and conferences on the theme of inclusion will also be proposed during the event to raise awareness and enable all participants to act on their own scale to respond to inclusion society’s challenges, such as digital inclusion, gentrification, urban justice or the sharing economy.

Why participate in Smart City Expo World Congress?

You are involved in the Smart City industry? You want to develop your network? Find partners or customers?

Smart City Expo is the place to connect with your entire ecosystem. Between start-ups, cities, institutions, politicians, more than 25,000 participants from around the world are expected for this event. Don’t miss it!

Moreover, according to the statistics provided by the organizers, two out of three people present at the event are decision-makers, which makes Smart City Expo the ideal place for the collection of qualified prospects and the creation of new collaborations. Overall 92% of participants were satisfied with the quality of contacts established in previous editions.

Join the adventure!

Practical information

From 19 to 21 November 2019 at the Fira Barcelona in Barcelona.

More information the Smart City Expo World Congress website.

 

What is the Smart City? To go further, read our article on the topic: How Can a Smart City Make Life Easier for People with Disabilities?

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This year, the Smart City Expo World Congress puts inclusion at the heart of its approach with an initiative called ‘Towards Inclusivity’, proposing measures to limit the divide related to disability, language, religion or gender.

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Zoe Gervais

Zoe Gervais

Content Manager

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The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

MaaS: A Solution for Tomorrow’s Mobility

MaaS: A Solution for Tomorrow’s Mobility

MaaS: a Solution for Tomorrow’s Mobility

 

Because mobility is not just about getting from point A to point B. It is way more than that. It is also about taking into account a whole series of factors such as the duration of the journey, the price, the quality of the service, the environmental impact and safety.

In a changing world where new mobility actors are constantly upsetting our cities’ balance, emerging digital alternatives such as Mobility as a Service i.e MaaS offer an innovative mobility experience for smart cities of the future.

Focus on a key concept of the Smart City that promises to transform our journeys of tomorrow.

What is MaaS?

MaaS stands for Mobility as a Service and is an application that seamlessly combines all existing transportation options, from travel planning to payment. MaaS smartly manages the transportation needs of users through the provision of real-time information combined with custom-made services.

MaaS was born in Finland where it already plays a key role in national transport policy. The concept is widely recognized around the world as a breakthrough innovation, one that will change the way everyone travels through digitization and the combination of the best mobility solutions.

MaaS is more than just a transport information platform. It’s a smart way to reach a destination.

MaaS: What impacts on cities and end users?

For public decision makers, MaaS represents a major challenge in controlling the mobility chain, data analysis and creating strong partnerships between various stakeholders.

Indeed, public authorities and private actors of MaaS must perfectly control the entire mobility chain to facilitate access to different modes of transport in a fluid and equal manner. To do so, it is necessary to encourage the design of multimodal urban centers.

Data analysis provides valuable information to transport operators and cities to adjust their network and services. The indirect objective is thus to better meet the needs of travelers and environmental purposes.

In order to set up such a tailor-made service, public authorities have the responsibility to create trustworthy partnerships between the different transport operators by offering contractual frameworks encouraging cooperation.

For users, MaaS is a answer to the myriad of mobility options in urban areas. From personal vehicles, shared mobility, vehicles with drivers to public transport, it can be difficult to make the right choice. Not to mention that the best trip is perhaps intermodal and combines several modes of transport a single journey.

The main advantages of this solution for users are:

  • reliability: MaaS provides correct information in real time and a high level of service,
  • simplicity: a single application allowing easy access to information,
  • flexibility: MaaS adapts to the preferences of each user taking into account their personal situation (ex: a sensory disability),
  • impartiality: the service displays all the possible options to best serve the needs of end users.

What will MaaS of the future look like?

The digitization of mobility is underway, followed by a constant increase in the number of services. New mobility offers will continue to develop (autonomous, electric, shared vehicles etc.) and customers’ expectations to evolve. Mobility services will merge more and more to form true intermodal continuity in the mobility chain. Therefore, the traveler’s choice will rely more on the price and the performance than on the mode itself.

MaaS of tomorrow will help all users make the right choice based on their personal preferences, the weather, and their physical and mental abilities. In the world of tomorrow, MaaS will be a true indoor/outdoor smart mobility assistant that will erase the barriers of disability by offering a 100% tailor-made mobility.

In short

It is becoming increasingly clear that we are at the beginning of a new era of mobility based on the digitalization of our modes of travel. 

Mobility as a Service is the key to change traveling behaviors towards more sustainable, more inclusive and more affordable mobility, given everyone’s disability.

MaaS seems to have a bright future. But is the Nordic mobility model easily applicable to other countries? Will all carriers agree to share their data with operators? What are the possible associations with existing ticketing services? Many challenges still need to be addressed …

To go further: Mobility Apps for Blind People or how Technology Can Replace Special Assistance at the Airport

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In the world of tomorrow, MaaS will be a true indoor/outdoor smart mobility assistant that will erase the barriers of disability by offering a 100% tailor-made mobility.

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Zoe Gervais

Zoe Gervais

Content Manager

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powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

Disability as an Innovation Driver for the Smart City

Disability as an Innovation Driver for the Smart City

Disability as an Innovation Driver for the Smart City

 

Smart City. We hear a lot of talk about it. This concept coming straight from the United States is starting to make its way into cities around the world.

But what is a smart city exactly? It is a city that puts at the service of its citizens Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to provide with services adapted to their needs in real time. It is found at different levels of society such as education, transportation, the environment, health or safety. The overall objective of the smart city is therefore to improve the quality of life of citizens through new technologies.

Nice program! But what are the actual innovations behind this approach? And how can they improve the lives of the most vulnerable citizens? In an aging world where by 2030 the number of people over the age of 60 is expected to reach 1.4 billion and that already has more than 1 billion people living with disabilities, one wonders how the smart city can respond to their needs.

 

Let’s explore initiatives from around the world that showcase new accessibility technologies. Here are some projects that caught our attention.

#1 Transport and Mobility

Intelligent urban mobility aims to make traveling in the city of all citizens easier, on foot, by public transport and by personal vehicle. Intelligent transport provides everyone with real-time, up-to-date data that has a positive impact on the environment and the quality of life of citizens.

We have selected for you some inspiring projects:

⊗ NAVIGUEO+ HIFI: customizable sound beacons installed in many transport networks in France at points of interest such as above a counter or at the entrance of a metro station indicating its location and transmitting practical information. This sound guidance system can be activated remotely using a smartphone, thus offering autonomy to blind and visually impaired people.

⊗ StreetCo: an application that promotes the mobility of people with reduced mobility thanks to a collaborative pedestrian GPS alerting users in real time of obstacles and informing them about the accessibility of nearby places.

⊗ MappedED!: a platform for inclusive academic mobility in Europe that provides an interactive map about various factors of university with a focus on students with disabilities.

⊗ Uber: the well-known mobility platform helps people with disability with an on-demand transportation service allowing more flexibility and spontaneity when moving for people with disability.

⊗ Autonomous vehicles: if currently the regulation prohibits people who do not have a driving license to drive a self-driving vehicle, this could soon change. Google showed a few years ago the potential of this voice-controlled technology for blind people. To be continued…

#2 Inclusion

The concept of inclusion is linked to human rights movements concerning people with disabilities highlighting the place of “full right” of all people in society, regardless of their characteristics.There are many initiatives that promote the inclusion of people with special needs in society. 

Here is our selection:

⊗ Avencod : “Nature creates differences, Avencod makes talents”. This is the slogan of the french-based company that employs people with autism Asperger to fulfill missions in digital areas such as web development.

⊗ The Open Voice Factory : a free software that helps give voice to people with communication difficulties.

⊗ The Disability Innovation Institute in Australia is doing research on smartphone use as a tool for integrating people with intellectual disabilities. The results show that the use of the smartphone increases social inclusion, the feeling of belonging to a group and social recognition.

 

#3 Health

New technologies including mobile technologies create smart health solutions for citizens. Some project leaders have focused their efforts on solutions dedicated to people with disabilities to enable them to gain autonomy in their daily lives.

⊗ The Evolvable Walking Aid : a modular range of parts that can be assembled to form a cane, crutches or a walking frame to avoid buying new equipment for walking when the mobility of the user is evolving.

⊗ WatchHelp : a mobile application connected to a watch that promotes the autonomy of people with mental and/or cognitive disorders. The application sends notifications in the form of simple visuals indicating the daily actions to be performed.

⊗ Wandercraft : exoskeletons allowing people with reduced mobility to walk independently and naturally.

 

#4 Safety

Safety is a major issue in reflections to improve the quality of life in the city. The safety of people with disabilities, which is put to the test daily, has inspired a french-based company:

⊗ aBeacon Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) : Okeenea won a call for innovation of New-York City’s Department of Transportation to implement a new generation of connected Accessible Pedestrian Signals that allow visually impaired pedestrians to cross the street safely. This new device is triggered remotely and delivers fully customizable information.

#5 Infrastructure

Building smart infrastructures in the cities of tomorrow helps including different population groups, including the elderly and people with disabilities. Smart Buildings are designed to meet the specific needs of the most vulnerable people from the design stage through data collection and sharing.

⊗ Connected retired homes: retired people are starting to embrace the internet of things with next-generation connected retirement homes. These smart life-care homes include immersive screens, connected boxes, automation, videoconferencing and mobile applications to help residents regain some independence.

#6 Information

⊗ Communicating urban furniture: Kansas City was among the finalists for the 2016 Smart City Challenge offering its residents at city key locations interactive kiosks used to collect and share data. The screens are backlit and at a height accessible to people in wheelchairs. The terminals are also equipped with audio jacks to allow people with visual impairments to connect headphones.

⊗ Humble Lamppost intelligent public lighting: a project competing with the innovation partnership for smart cities and communities. The project leaders have thought of a connected floor lamp that broadcasts sound information tailored to the citizens. The autonomous device also saves energy and increases the safety of pedestrians nearby.

The smart city is a vector of innovations in areas related to disability and accessibility. New technology and IOT offers new opportunities to empower a growing group of people with specific disabilities.

Always wondered how Vision Zero project impacts road safety? Read our article!

Designers of the Smart City, decision-makers, a smart city is an inclusive and accessible city. Think about the needs of the most fragile users from the conception by consulting them and universal accessibility of your solutions will be guaranteed!

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Designers of the Smart City, decision-makers, a smart city is an inclusive and accessible city.

Think about the needs of the most fragile users from the conception by consulting them and universal accessibility of your solutions will be guaranteed!

writer

Zoe Gervais

Zoe Gervais

Content Manager

stay updated

Get the latest news about accessibility and the Smart City.

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powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

Vision Zero: A Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

Vision Zero: A Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

Vision Zero: a Revolutionary Approach to Road Safety

 

Looking for inspiration to improve road safety in your city? The Vision Zero movement continues to grow in the world. A few years for an ambitious but achievable goal: 0 traffic death on the roads!

“Because human life is priceless!” This could be the slogan of the international Vision Zero approach. Born in Sweden in 1997, this revolutionary approach to road safety aims to reduce the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads. How? By placing the responsibility for the risks of accidents on the designers of the road and not only on its users. From Stockholm to Toronto, through the largest cities in the United States, dozens of cities have joined the Vision Zero movement around the world. We invite you to discover this concept of a city primarily centered on respect for human life!

 

Different Strategies for Road Safety

 

The Vision Zero approach is based on a simple principle: fatalities are preventable, so they are unacceptable. This is to eliminate all causes of foreseeable accidents during the design or rehabilitation of the road network. The protection of life and human health is non-negotiable and is at the forefront of any other benefit (traffic flow, travel speed, etc.). The designers of the road networks must then make every effort to secure the travel of all, without forgetting the most vulnerable users: children, the elderly, people with disabilities or reduced mobility. While it is unrealistic to want to remove all accidents, it is almost always possible to limit their impact on the physical integrity and health of the victims.

 

3 Flagship Measures: Reducing Speed, Securing Roads and Raising Awareness Among Stakeholders

 

To succeed in your Vision Zero project, you should better proceed in stages. Before establishing an action plan, it is necessary to involve all stakeholders under strong and determined leadership. This is the approach adopted by the city of Montreal by forming a dedicated team, with 7 additional hires, and by forming a steering committee bringing together the most influential players in road safety. The next step is to analyze accident data in order to identify the risks and hazards present on the road network. The analysis of these data serves as the basis for the action plan.

 

Travel Speeds Adapted To The Infrastructure

The higher the speed, the greater the risk of mortality. The maximum speed in a given area is therefore calculated according to the characteristics of this area and adapted to the type of users:

⊗ In areas with motorized vehicles alongside pedestrians, the speed must not exceed 30 km/h (19 mph). This is the limit not to be exceeded for a pedestrian to have a chance of survival in a collision. It is even recommended to lower it to 20 km/h (12 mph). If the maximum permitted speed is greater, the pedestrian routes must be physically separated from the traffic lanes.

⊗ In areas with many intersections where vehicle crossings are possible, the speed must be less than 50 km/h (31 mph). Beyond that, a side impact can be fatal. At 50 km/h (31 mph), pedestrian flows must be protected.

⊗ In less dense traffic areas, with rare intersections, the recommended speed limit is 70 km/h (43 mph).

⊗ Finally, a speed greater than 100 km/h (62 mph) can only be justified when traffic lanes in opposite directions are clearly separated, eliminating any risk of frontal impact.

Measures To Eliminate Road Hazards

Street users should never be at risk of accidents as long as they follow the rules. This is the foundation of Vision Zero philosophy. It is the responsibility of the designers of the road to prevent as much as possible all the dangers. Some examples of measures to put in place:

⊗ Reduce the presence of motorized vehicles in the city;

⊗ Secure pedestrian crossings;

⊗ Upgrade the traffic lights using the most advanced technologies: digital countdown, activation of Accessible Pedestrian Signals for the blind and visually impaired, possibility of increasing the duration of the crossing for people with reduced mobility, etc. ;

⊗ Improve lighting;

⊗ Regulate the traffic of alternative modes and Personal Light Electric Vehicles (PLEVs), such as electric scooters, hoverboards, Segways, skateboards, etc. ;

⊗ Secure school surroundings;

⊗ Improve cycling conditions.

Awareness Actions

By reversing the traditional vision of road safety, the Vision Zero approach implies a change in mindsets among the decision makers and designers of the road and its users.

Thus, the training of road actors fits into most Vision Zero action plans, as in London, New York City, San Antonio or Chicago.

For the benefit of users, the city of Montreal has issued a charter of good conduct on which everyone can commit to road safety.

San Francisco’s LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired has launched its own awareness campaign to remind drivers of the right of way for pedestrians with a white cane or guide dog when crossing the street.

 

In short

250 stakeholders have already joined the global Vision Zero movement.

Speed ​​reduction, securing roads and educating stakeholders, there are countless measures to make the city safer for all its users.

The success of a Vision Zero project comes first and foremost through political commitment, the coordination of stakeholders and the scrupulous monitoring of actions.

 

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Street users should never be at risk of accidents as long as they follow the rules. This is the foundation of Vision Zero philosophy. It is the responsibility of the designers of the road to prevent as much as possible all the dangers.

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Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

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The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

European Accessibility Act: What Will Change?

 

Eighty million Europeans living with a disability will benefit from more accessible goods and services at competitive prices! The European Accessibility Act was adopted by the European Parliament and Council. Member States have a six-year transition period before having to fully enforce it. Among the areas it covers are information for travelers, vending machines, banking services, e-commerce, e-books and emergency numbers. It is a small revolution for those with a disability and a huge challenge for businesses.

Towards Free Movement of Accessible Goods and Services

The European Accessibility Act has been on the agenda since July 2017 and has two principal goals:

⊗ Improve the daily life of the elderly, disabled people and people with reduced mobility throughout the entire European Union (80 million people at a conservative estimate); and

⊗ Facilitate the circulation of accessible goods and services by removing barriers created by divergent laws among the various Member States.

Businesses should see a reduction in costs from the standardization of accessibility laws throughout Europe. Furthermore, they will gain access to a large market for their products and services.


As for those living with a disability, they will benefit from a wider range of accessible goods and services at more competitive prices. Benefits are also expected for them in the areas of education and job access. Their expertise in accessibility should see a rise in demand and their professional integration will be eased by software accessibility.

Principles of Universal Design

Under this new European directive, goods and services should be designed in a way that allows them to be used by everyone, regardless of their particular difficulty:

⊗ color-blindness, poor vision or complete blindness;

⊗ poor hearing or profound deafness;

⊗ speech problems or total mutism;

⊗ problems in gripping or absence of physical strength;

⊗ reduced mobility;

⊗ cognitive difficulties (reading, gesturing, memory, etc.).

Essentially, every good or service must be “perceptible, usable, understandable and sturdy.” This means:

⊗ An action should be possible by using different sensory methods (voice message, speech recognition, visual display, touch);

⊗The transfer of information should also be possible via various sensory methods;

⊗ Visual contrasts ought to be considered;

⊗ The font can be increased;

⊗ It should be possible to change the volume and speed of audio messages;

⊗ Actions requiring strength or precision should be limited;

⊗ Latency time between two actions ought to be open to configuration;

⊗ There should be information on accessibility functions;

⊗ And, of course, assistance technologies should be compatible (screen readers, audio support, voice command, etc.).

Interested to know if Accessible Pedestrian Signals are required in your country? Check this article!

From Ticketing Machines to E-commerce Platforms, Many Areas Are Covered!

The directive mainly applies to digital services and related equipment:

⊗ Computers and operating systems;

⊗ Ticketing machines, check-in machines;

⊗ Smartphones;

⊗ Audiovisual services, digital television and related equipment;

⊗ Telephony services;

⊗ Public transportation ticketing and related information (road, rail, air, sea or river);

⊗ Bank services;

⊗ E-books; and

⊗ E-commerce.

Now that the European Accessibility Act has been adopted by the European Parliament and the European Council, only its publication in the Official Journal remains. After that formality, Member States will have three years to transpose the directive into national law and another three to apply it. Some associations representing disabled people have criticized the text’s lack of ambition, lamenting how it does not apply to transportation infrastructure, streets and buildings. It also includes many restrictions for small businesses. Let’s hope however that the new European Accessibility Act will be a positive impetus for the extension of universal design to all areas of everyday life!

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For those living with a disability, they will benefit from a wider range of accessible goods and services at more competitive prices.

writer

Lise Wagner

Lise Wagner

Accessibility Expert

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Get the latest news about accessibility and the Smart City.

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powered by okeenea

The French leading company

on the accessibility market.

For more than 25 years, we have been developing architectural access solutions for buildings and streets. Everyday, we rethink today’s cities to transform them in smart cities accessible to everyone.

By creating solutions ever more tailored to the needs of people with disabilities, we push the limits, constantly improve the urban life and make the cities more enjoyable for the growing majority.